Pupil Premium

What it is

Reynolds Academy receives additional funding called the Pupil Premium to support efforts to ensure that all groups of children have the opportunity to achieve well. Funding is allocated to those pupils who are eligible for free school meals, are in the care of a local authority, or are members of service families.

The Academy uses the pupil premium funding to accelerate the progress of these groups so that the gap between their achievement and that of their peers is narrowed.

What we receive

In 2013-2014 the academy received £102,162 Pupil Premium funding.

In 2014-2015 the academy received £164,000 Pupil Premium funding.

In 2015-2016 the academy received £154,440 Pupil Premium funding.

In 2016-17 the academy has received £146,520 Pupil Premium funding.

What we do with it

This money was and will continue to be used by the Academy to:

  1. Reduce class sizes to improve opportunities and outcomes.
  2. Organise one-to-one sessions and small group teaching for some students to support their progress in English and Mathematics.
  3. Holiday booster group sessions in maths and English.
  4. Increased support to address shortfall in maths and English skills.
  5. Provide free music tuition.
  6. Subsidise educational visits to broaden horizons and raise aspirations.
  7. Fund specialist teachers in Music, French, Computer Science and PE.
  8. Enable free access through the academy's VLE to e-books to encourage and support home reading.
  9. Increased pastoral support for vulnerable children.
  10. Additional resources.
  11. Additional extra-curricular clubs.

How it makes a difference

The wider curriculum offering, funded through the pupil premium, provides experiences that nurture interests and talents. Children, for whom the school receives pupil premium, leave the academy with ambitions and aspirations not dissimilar to those of their peers.

The additional pupil premium funding has led to improved rates of progress for disadvantaged pupils in most areas.

Foundation Stage 2

Though there are only two disadvantaged children, both reached a good level of development which is a higher proportion than those not.

With the exception of Space, Shape and Measure and Technology disadvantaged pupils have made more progress over the year than non-disadvantaged in all other areas.

Key Stage 1

The proportion of disadvantaged pupils attaining the expected standard or better in all 3 subjects (reading, writing and maths), is higher than other pupils and is a reversal of the previous year.

In Reading, all disadvantaged pupils entering KS1 at expected standard leave at expected or better standard compared to 95% of non-disadvantaged pupils.

In Reading, well over half of disadvantaged pupils entering KS1 at emerging standard leave at expected standard compared with under half of non-disadvantaged pupils.

In Writing, all disadvantaged pupils entering KS1 at expected standard leave at expected or better standard compared with 95% of non-disadvantaged pupils.

In Writing, two thirds of disadvantaged pupils entering KS1 at emerging standard leave at expected standard compared with well below a half of non-disadvantaged pupils.

In Mathematics, all disadvantaged pupils entering KS1 at expected standard leave at expected or better standard compared to 96% of non-disadvantaged pupils.

In Mathematics, two thirds of disadvantaged pupils entering KS1 at emerging standard leave at expected standard compared with less than half of non-disadvantaged pupils.

Key Stage 2

Disadvantaged pupils make slower progress in Reading and Mathematics but in Writing the gap is reversed.

Full national comparators for progress are not yet available.

The proportion of disadvantaged pupils attaining the expected standard or better in all 3 subjects (reading, writing and maths), is lower than other pupils.

Thinking Of Becoming A Teacher?

Apply For 2017 Today

Reynolds Academy Principal

Andrew Clark
BA.

Tollbar MAT Chief Executive

David J Hampson
OBE, BSc, BA.
Top